Maryland Synod

Catechization by John Morris

“In the primitive church there was a private and public catechization. The private was practiced by parents according to Eph. 6:4… The public was held in schools, churches, and other places, and the pupils were called catechumens, from κατγχουμενοι, learners, the word that is used in the New Testament passages before quoted. “In the course of ages, as the church became more corrupt, the practice fell into disuse, or sadly degenerated.

Life Reminiscences of an Old Lutheran Minister by John Gottlieb Morris

“…Even after the Seminary was established at Gettysburg, systematic and sustained, but covert, attack upon the Symbolical Books was made. The result was that the books were not regarded with favor by many of the ministers and students, and very many did not accept the doctrine of the sacraments as taught in the Lutheran Church. “This continued to be the state of affairs for many years. There were some that were true Lutherans despite these adverse circumstances.

Paul Gerhardt: A Short Biography of the Hymn Writer by John Gottlieb Morris

“Never were pious resignation to God’s will — complete subjection to His sovereignty – perfect patience under disappointment and sorrow more beautifully and impressively uttered… We do not think it possible for human language to express a more thorough acquiescence in the decrees of Providence. This was the character of Gerhardt’s piety, and to be in all things of the same mind with God, is the perfection of piety.” – John Morris.

Charles Frederick Schaeffer: A Biographical Sketch

Charles Frederick Schaeffer was born in Germantown, Pa., September 3rd, 1807. His father, Frederick David Schaeffer, born November 16th, 1760, died January 27th, 1836, was then Pastor of St. Michael’s Church, and remained there until 1812, when, at the close of a pastorate of 22 years, he removed to St. Michael’s and Zion’s, Philadelphia. It was within this venerable mother Church that the youth of the departed was spent. His first training for his life work was received in the Christian family of the devoted pastor, a school which has ever trained many noble men and women for blessed work in life and reward in heaven.

James Allen Brown: A Biographical Sketch

Rev. James Allen Brown, D.D. James Allen, the son of James and Ann Brown, was born in Drumore township, Lancaster county, Pa., February 19, 1821. Both parents were Quakers, and the early years of their five sons and two daughters were passed amid the duties and toils incident to the farmer’s life. James Allen early evinced an unusual desire for study. His days were given to work, and his evenings to reading.

A Concise Introduction to Luther's Larger and Smaller Catechism by John Morris

“We want no broader line than the catechism draws; but then we do not want that line whitewashed out by a diluted and false liberalism, so as nearly to obliterate it. We desire to see it remain in its original breadth and depth, so that we may consistently and honestly reply to the query: ‘What are the distinctive doctrines of your church?’ ‘You will find an epitome of them in Luther’s Smaller Catechism.

The New Theology: S. S. Schmucker And Its Other Defenders by James Allen Brown

“Suffice it to say that faith is faith, and not obedience, or love or delight in God, or any other distinct grace or virtue. Nor does the Bible say being justified by obedience, or love, or delight, or good works, but ‘being justified by faith, we have peace with God.’” Table of Contents Justification by Faith versus Schmucker’s “New Theology” About the Author, Rev. James Allen Brown Contents Faith is not obedience Download the eBook Justification by Faith versus Schmucker’s “New Theology” “The substance of this fundamental doctrine may be considered as embraced in these two points – First, that the ground of the sinner’s justification before God is not any righteousness or merit of his own, but the merit and righteousness of Jesus Christ; and, secondly, that the condition of receiving this is not any virtue or morality on the part of the sinner, but faith alone, to the exclusion of everything else as a necessary part in the work of justification.