Roe

A Day of Fate by Edward Payson Roe

"It is a love story, pure and simple, of the type that belongs to no age or clime or school, because it is the story of the love that has been common to humanity, wherever it has been lifted above the level of the brutes." — New York Observer On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents List of Illustrations Reviews for A Day of Fate Preface Book 1 1.

A Face Illumined by Edward Payson Roe

"A Face Illumined is one of E.P. Roe's best novels in my opinion. I loved his thoughts on inner beauty. –eleniel "The author does not, as is often the case, make the moral design an excuse for literary shortcomings. His characters are stamped with a strong individuality, and depicted with a naturalness that indicates a keen student of human nature and modern life." — Boston Traveller On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents Reviews Preface 1.

A Knight of the Nineteenth Century by Edward Payson Roe

"This book contains the elements of perfect work, clearness and brilliancy of style, conciseness and beauty of expression, a good plot, an entertaining story, and a most excellent moral." — Christian Intelligencer. "The whole tone of the work is manly and healthful. It is thoroughly noble in all its teachings and tendencies." — Utica Herald. "It is a book which those who begin will be pretty sure to finish, deriving from it a new impulse to the truest knighthood.

From Jest to Earnest by Edward Payson Roe

"He vindicates his right to use the talent which God has given him for the instruction and interest of the thousands who read his works." — New York Evangelist. "The hero is simple, strong, and manly; much such a man as Mr. Lincoln must have been had he turned his attention to theology instead of politics." — New York World. "It is surprising to find how genuinely interesting his stories always are.

Opening a Chestnut Burr by Edward Payson Roe

“The character of the selfish, morbid, cynical hero, and his gradual transformation under the influence of the sweet and high-spirited heroine, are portrayed with a masculine firmness, which is near akin to power, and some of the conversations are animated and admirable.” — Atlantic Monthly “The most able story that we have had from the pen of Mr. Roe. It is also the best of the so-called religious novels published of late.

What Can She Do? a novel by Edward Roe

“The narrative is fascinating.” — Chicago Advance. “An exceedingly well-written story.” — Churchman. On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents Reviews Preface 1. Three Girls 2. A Future Of Human Designing 3. Three Men 4. The Skies Darkening 5. The Storm Threatening 6. The Wreck 7. Among The Breakers 8. Warped 9. A Desert Island 10. Edith Becomes A “Divinity” 11.

The Great Chicago Fire: Barriers Burned Away by Edward Roe

“Barriers Burned Away, a story of the Great Chicago Fire, was first published serially in a magazine, the New York Evangelist. In 1872, when it came out in book form, it shortly became the most popular book of the year. When his next two novels achieved similar success, Roe decided to leave the ministry and give full time to writing. He believed he could reach more people with the message of Christianity through his writing than through preaching.

He Fell In Love With His Wife: a novel by Edward Roe

This book was inspired by a newspaper account telling of a widowed farmer who visited the county poor house, looking for a good housekeeper. He is supposed to have said, “If there is a worthy woman here, I will marry her.” From the dust jacket: “A simple, strong story of American life. “The stern, silent hero is a farmer, a man with honest, sincere views of life, and of sufficient education to make him an alien among the other farmers.