Krauth

Christian Liberty by Charles Krauth

“The body without the spirit is dead, but it retains for a while the form; and while the form is there, hope may sometimes lie cherished that life will yet revisit it; but when even the form is gone, and the body fallen to ashes, unless God shall speak, hope is extinct forever. “It is a sad thing to see the form robbed of the power; but there is one stage of misery below this.

The Life of Henry Clay by Charles Krauth

If it weren’t for the American statesman Henry Clay, “Who can tell the evils which would have ensued? “Would we this day be a united and happy people, prosperous beyond example, and with a most brilliant career opening before us, the envy of tyrants, and the boast of the friends of freedom the world over? “Would we be living in peace with all men, governing ourselves, promoting by our efforts pure morality and genuine religion; sitting under our own vine and fig tree, there being none to hurt or make us afraid?

A Compact Biography of Charles Porterfield Krauth by Beale Melanchthon Schmucker

“Dr. Krauth was beyond all question the most learned and distinguished among all Lutheran theologians that use the English Language, and the great scholars of our church in other parts of the world have long ago ranked him among the chief scholars of the great church of theologians.” – Dr. G. F. Krotel “He understood the faith, and he gave his best energies to its exposition, inculcation and defense against all assailants.

Infant Baptism And Infant Salvation In The Calvinistic System – A Review Of Dr. Hodge's Systematic Theology by Charles Krauth

“What happens to young children who die? If you’ve ever wondered about the so-called “Age of Accountability”, or how “Original Sin” relates to infants, this small book can help.” …Many of the greatest of the Reformed divines have been overwhelmed with what they grant is on this point – the objective force of Baptism – the faith of all the fathers and of the entire Christian Church through all the ages before the rise of Calvinism.

The Book of Concord: The Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church by Henry Eyster Jacobs and Charles Krauth

Here is a clear, trustworthy and easy-to-search and navigate version of the Lutheran Confessions. This edition was prepared by Henry Eyster Jacobs for the use of all the Lutheran Churches in America and published as The People’s Edition. On This Page Summary of the Contents About the Translation Download the eBook Publication Information Summary of the Contents I. The General Creeds: The Apostles’ Creed. The Nicene Creed.

Charles Philip Krauth Sr.: A Biographical Sketch

Rev. Charles Philip Krauth, Sr., D.D. The older Dr. Krauth was born in Montgomery county, Pa., May 7, 1797. His father was a native of Germany, and came to this country as a young man, in the capacity of a school teacher and a church organist. His mother was a Pennsylvanian. They lived in New York, Pennsylvania, and in Baltimore, Md., also for many years in Virginia, highly respected and enjoying the confideLce of their neighbors.

Charles Porterfield Krauth: A Biographical Sketch

Rev. Charles Porterfield Krauth, Jr., D.D., LL.D. The ancestors of Dr. Charles Porterfield Krauth, on his father’s side, were of German descent. His grandfather, Charles J. Krauth, came to this country as a young man before the close of the last century, and became teacher and organist in the service of the German Reformed church. He was married to Catharine Doll, a Lutheran. When residing in Montgomery Co., Pa.

The First Free Lutheran Diet Edited by Henry Eyster Jacobs

The First Free Diet [formal discussion] of the Lutheran Church was held at St. Matthew’s Church in Philadelphia on December 27-28, 1877. It had representatives from four of the largest Synods at the time. The speakers included some of the great defenders of orthodox Lutheranism in America: Emanuel Greenwald, Charles Krauth, Henry Eyster Jacobs and others. The remarks made by participants are of particular interest. On This Page Included: Download the eBook Included: The Relations Of The Lutheran Church To The Denominations Around Us by Charles Porterfield Krauth.

The Burning Of The Old Lutheran Church by Charles Krauth

The Burning Of The Old Lutheran Church, On The Night Of September 27th, 1854, a message delivered In The Evangelical Lutheran Church, Winchester, Va., The Nineteenth Sunday After Trinity, 1854. Writes Dr. Krauth: “To the blessed Three, the Undivided One, they reared this house…It is consecrated…to our Evangelical Religion only. They did not simply say, We consecrate it to religion, (though that would have been enough if none were in error as to what religion is,) for even the Pagan calls his dark superstition religion; not simply ‘to the Christian religion,’ for the Mormon calls his beastly materialism the Christian religion; but they used that definite term which placed their meaning beyond question, just as they found it necessary amid the “gods many and lords many,” to say not simply ‘to God,’ but to ‘the one God, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost.

Sayings of Charles Porterfield Krauth

This little book consists of pithy selections from the biography of Charles Krauth. “Every sincere Christian should know Krauth.” This Lutheran Library “short” is taken from the two volume biography of Charles Krauth published by Adolph Spaeth. Spaeth includes in his Preface to that work the following: “The Motto chosen for this Memoir is Dr. Krauth’s description of Martin Luther, in the biography of the great Reformer which he undertook shortly before his death – “Faithful to the Truth, and true to the Faith.