Krauth

The Missouri Doctrine of Election by Otto Zöckler

"A decade has fully passed since the outbreak of the eventful controversy which has divided the Lutherans of North America into two camps. Dr. Walther showed already in the years of 1864—70, a leaning to the Calvinistic doctrines… The controversy itself broke out first in the year 1872, when Lehre und Wehre, the organ of the Missourians, (p. 205) directed a sharp attack upon Philippi of Rostock, accusing him of Synergism on account of his treatment of the doctrine of conversion in his Dogmatics.

The Bible a Perfect Book by Charles Krauth

“The word of God is… inspired, for it comes from God; it is human, for it comes through man. But remember, we do not say that the human is without the divine. The Spirit, is incarnate in the Word, as the Son was incarnate in Christ. – Charles Krauth On This Page Both Christ and the Bible are “The Word” The Simplest Interpretation is The Best Download the eBook Publication Information Both Christ and the Bible are “The Word” “There is a deep significance in the fact, that the title of “the Word” is given both to Christ, the Revealer, and to the Bible, the revelation of God, so that in some passages great critics differ as to which is meant.

Why Study the Lutheran Confessions? by Charles Krauth

“It is vastly more important to know what the Reformation retained than what it overthrew; for the overthrow of error, though often an indispensable prerequisite to the establishment of truth, is not truth itself; it may clear the foundation simply to substitute one error for another, perhaps a greater for a less. “By a careful study of the symbolical books of our church, commencing with the Augsburg Confession and its Apology, a more thorough understanding of the history, difficulties, true genius, and triumphs of the Reformation will be attained than by reading every thing that can be got, or that has ever been written about that memorable movement.

Christian Liberty by Charles Krauth

“The body without the spirit is dead, but it retains for a while the form; and while the form is there, hope may sometimes lie cherished that life will yet revisit it; but when even the form is gone, and the body fallen to ashes, unless God shall speak, hope is extinct forever. “It is a sad thing to see the form robbed of the power; but there is one stage of misery below this.

The Life of Henry Clay by Charles Krauth

If it weren’t for the American statesman Henry Clay, “Who can tell the evils which would have ensued? “Would we this day be a united and happy people, prosperous beyond example, and with a most brilliant career opening before us, the envy of tyrants, and the boast of the friends of freedom the world over? “Would we be living in peace with all men, governing ourselves, promoting by our efforts pure morality and genuine religion; sitting under our own vine and fig tree, there being none to hurt or make us afraid?

A Compact Biography of Charles Porterfield Krauth by Beale Melanchthon Schmucker

“Dr. Krauth was beyond all question the most learned and distinguished among all Lutheran theologians that use the English Language, and the great scholars of our church in other parts of the world have long ago ranked him among the chief scholars of the great church of theologians.” – Dr. G. F. Krotel “He understood the faith, and he gave his best energies to its exposition, inculcation and defense against all assailants.

Infant Baptism And Infant Salvation In The Calvinistic System – A Review Of Dr. Hodge's Systematic Theology by Charles Krauth

“What happens to young children who die? If you’ve ever wondered about the so-called “Age of Accountability”, or how “Original Sin” relates to infants, this small book can help.” …Many of the greatest of the Reformed divines have been overwhelmed with what they grant is on this point – the objective force of Baptism – the faith of all the fathers and of the entire Christian Church through all the ages before the rise of Calvinism.

The Book of Concord: The Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church by Henry Eyster Jacobs and Charles Krauth

Here is a clear, trustworthy and easy-to-search and navigate version of the Lutheran Confessions. This edition was prepared by Henry Eyster Jacobs for the use of all the Lutheran Churches in America and published as The People’s Edition. On This Page Summary of the Contents About the Translation Download the eBook Publication Information Summary of the Contents I. The General Creeds: The Apostles’ Creed. The Nicene Creed.

Charles Philip Krauth Sr.: A Biographical Sketch

Rev. Charles Philip Krauth, Sr., D.D. The older Dr. Krauth was born in Montgomery county, Pa., May 7, 1797. His father was a native of Germany, and came to this country as a young man, in the capacity of a school teacher and a church organist. His mother was a Pennsylvanian. They lived in New York, Pennsylvania, and in Baltimore, Md., also for many years in Virginia, highly respected and enjoying the confideLce of their neighbors.

Charles Porterfield Krauth: A Biographical Sketch

Rev. Charles Porterfield Krauth, Jr., D.D., LL.D. The ancestors of Dr. Charles Porterfield Krauth, on his father’s side, were of German descent. His grandfather, Charles J. Krauth, came to this country as a young man before the close of the last century, and became teacher and organist in the service of the German Reformed church. He was married to Catharine Doll, a Lutheran. When residing in Montgomery Co., Pa.