History

Abraham Lincoln The Christian by William Jackson Johnstone

The Rev. Phineas D. Gurley, D.D., Mr. Lincoln’s pastor while President, writes: “I have had frequent and intimate conversations with him [Lincoln] on the subject of the Bible and the Christian religion, when he could have had no motive to deceive me, and I considered him sound, not only on the truth of the Christian religion, but on all its fundamental doctrines and teachings. And, more than that, in the latter days of his chastened and weary life, after the death of his son Willie, and his visit to the battlefield of Gettysburg, he said, with tears in his eyes, that he had lost confidence in everything but God, and that he now believed his heart was changed and that he loved the Saviour, and, if he was not deceived in himself, it was his intention soon to make a profession of religion.

The Suppressed Truth About The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln by Burke McCarty

“The death of President Lincoln was the culmination of but one step in the attempt to carry out the Secret Treaty of Verona, of October, 1822, a pact entered into by the “high contracting parties” of the former Congress of Vienna, Austria, which had held its sessions secret, covering the whole year of 1814-15. “Simultaneously with the calling of the Congress of Vienna in 1814, Pope Pius VIIth restored the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order) which had been abolished by Pope Clement IVth, July 21, 1773, on the grounds that it was immoral, dangerous and was a menace to the very life of the papacy.

The Book of Concord: The Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church by Henry Eyster Jacobs and Charles Krauth

Henry Eyster Jacobs’ Book of Concord in modern English is highly respected and has been widely used. It is now back in print and available in all formats. The Augsburg Confession, Apology, Small and Large Catechisms, and Formula are also available as separate books. On This Page Book Contents About the Translation Order a Printed Copy Download the eBook Publication Information Clear print, large format quality paperback available on Amazon by the Lutheran Librarian

The Augsburg Confession With The Saxon Visitation Articles by Martin Luther

The Augsburg Confession is the first part of the Book of Concord, the Lutheran Confessions. The Saxon Visitation Articles were used by pastors to instruct their congregants and appeared in Saxon editions of the Book of Concord until the forced union of Lutheran and Reformed in the Nineteenth Century. In republishing this book, we seek to introduce this editor and content to a new generation of those seeking authentic spirituality.

What's Wrong With The World? by George H. Gerberding

“Unbelieving and unrighteous men do hate the old Church doctrines. Why? Because these old teachings as to sin, guilt, retribution, the fact and need of a divine-human vicarious atonement the need of sovereign grace, the need of the divinely instituted means and all that these fundamental teachings imply – these teachings are unwelcome to the reason of the natural man. They are not the teachings that unaided reason would or could originate.

The Lutheran Church in the Country by George H. Gerberding

“There are thousands of sincere, well meaning and earnest Christians in the Reformed churches in every section of the country. They recognize and deplore the threatening change that has come over the church life of the country. They fear the impending heathenizing. They plan and pray for a remedy…” “They never have been clearly instructed in God’s way in His sanctuary. They do not know that God has His own way of saving humanity and that His way of salvation is clearly marked out in His Word.

The Life and Letters of William Passavant by George Gerberding

“A family from Norway consisting of father, mother and four children, through the aid of benevolent persons at home, had obtained the means to emigrate to this country. They fared well across the Atlantic Ocean, and a little farther than Buffalo, N. Y., where the father, by accident, was caught under the wheels of a car which passed over his body and cut off his legs above the knees. The cars passed on at their usual rate, leaving the poor man to his fate on the track.