Confessions

Why Study the Lutheran Confessions? by Charles Krauth

“It is vastly more important to know what the Reformation retained than what it overthrew; for the overthrow of error, though often an indispensable prerequisite to the establishment of truth, is not truth itself; it may clear the foundation simply to substitute one error for another, perhaps a greater for a less. “By a careful study of the symbolical books of our church, commencing with the Augsburg Confession and its Apology, a more thorough understanding of the history, difficulties, true genius, and triumphs of the Reformation will be attained than by reading every thing that can be got, or that has ever been written about that memorable movement.

The Nature of Fundamental Doctrines by Charles F. Schaeffer

“What are ‘fundamental doctrines,’ or ‘fundamental Articles of Faith’?… Every intelligent Christian feels competent to state the general basis of his belief, or the doctrinal foundation of his Christian character and life… When he, however, proceeds to specify in detail the doctrines which essentially constitute that ‘foundation,’ he will no longer be surprised by the embarrassment that even distinguished divines, on attempting to furnish an answer, have candidly confessed.” – Charles F.

The Life of Philip Melanchthon by Joseph Stump

“The life of so distinguished a servant of God as Melanchthon deserves to be better known to the general reader than it actually is. In the great Reformation of the sixteenth century, his work stands second to that of Luther alone. Yet his life is comparatively unknown to many intelligent Christians. “In the preparation of this book, the author has made use of a number of biographies of Melanchthon by German authors…His aim has been to prepare a brief but sufficiently comprehensive life of Melanchthon, in such a form as would interest the people… That these pages may, in some measure at least, accomplish their purpose, and make the Christian reader more familiar with the work and merit of the man of God whom they endeavor to portray, is the sincere wish of the author.

The Lutheran Confessions: A Brief Introduction by Henry Eyster Jacobs

“There are points in the Church’s history, years, months, days, in which all the evil that has ever assailed the Church, seems brought to a focus, and to overcome it, the Holy Ghost, who never deserts his charge, concentrates against it not only the sum of all the experience of the Church of the past, but also the endowments of new, fuller, richer unfoldings of the sense and power of God’s Word.

First Principles Of The Reformation – The Three Primary Works Of Luther And The 95 Theses by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim

Many people have opinions about Martin Luther, but few have actually read his words. This small volume includes what church scholars Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim consider Luther’s three primary works. These are the Address to the Nobility of the German Nation, Concerning Christian Liberty and On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church. The famous 95 Theses are here too, as well as two helpful introductions, one theological, and the other historical.

The Book of Concord: The Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church by Henry Eyster Jacobs and Charles Krauth

Here is a clear, trustworthy and easy-to-search and navigate version of the Lutheran Confessions. This edition was prepared by Henry Eyster Jacobs for the use of all the Lutheran Churches in America and published as The People’s Edition. On This Page Summary of the Contents About the Translation Download the eBook Publication Information Summary of the Contents I. The General Creeds: The Apostles’ Creed. The Nicene Creed.

The Confessional Principle by Theodore E. Schmauk

This is Dr. Schmauk’s magnum opus on Christian Confessionalism, a treasure of approachable, Biblically Conservative scholarship. “No Creed but Christ” If you simply content yourself with the assertion, “The Bible is my creed,” you are leaving unanswered many of the most important and vital questions of faith and life. When you refuse to take a definite stand on vital issues in the Christian Faith, but say, “The Bible is my creed,” are you really confessing Christ?

A Concise Introduction to Luther's Larger and Smaller Catechism by John Morris

“We want no broader line than the catechism draws; but then we do not want that line whitewashed out by a diluted and false liberalism, so as nearly to obliterate it. We desire to see it remain in its original breadth and depth, so that we may consistently and honestly reply to the query: ‘What are the distinctive doctrines of your church?’ ‘You will find an epitome of them in Luther’s Smaller Catechism.

Martin Luther's Small Catechism translated by Henry Eyster Jacobs

“The Law, therefore, can make no Christian, for the wrath and displeasure of God abide upon us forever, as long as we cannot keep it and do what God demands of us; but the faith of the Creed brings pure grace, and makes us godly and acceptable to God. “For by the knowledge of this we love and delight in all the commandments of God; because we see that God, with all that he has, gives himself to us – the Father, with all creatures; the Son, with his entire work; and the Holy Ghost, with all his gifts – to assist and enable us to keep the Ten Commandments.

Martin Luther's Large Catechism translated by Henry Eyster Jacobs

Perhaps the best introduction to Luther’s Work. The essence of Biblical Christianity is here. Read Luther! On This Page From a Pastor From the Translator: Luther from the Large Catechism Download the eBook From a Pastor “For Reformation Sunday I talked a little about the Large Catechism, which I owned as a separate paperback (Augsburg Press, ALC). I read it all the time for years, because it also serves as another way to read Luther’s Sermons, but using the Catechism as an outline.

Churches And Sects Of Christendom by J. L. Neve

“The Christian religion has been called a way of life. It is indeed a way of life, but it is at the same time a way of faith and a way of thought. If it should cease to be a way of thought, it would soon cease to be a way of life. “The things we believe make up our creed, and our creed determines our character and our conduct.