Christian Fiction

Visibility Zero by Bernard Palmer

The time is World War II. Rex Madden is an American flier in the European campaign who loses his courage after seeing his companions meet death in the skies. Fear overwhelms him. At last he discovers “the Christ of fighting men” and finds peace and courage amid the chaos of war. Bernard Palmer (1914-1998) wrote many religious novels, mostly for young people. Download the eBook PDF - [Formatted for Computer Use]

An Original Belle by Edward Roe

“The descriptions of battle scenes in the war and the lurid picture of the draft riots in New York are worth reading. Nothing that Mr. Roe has ever written is so vivid and dramatic as his sketch of the three terrible days in New York when the mob ruled the city, sacked the colored orphan asylum, and spread dismay in a thousand homes. It has the quality of history also, as the author has made careful research and employs no incidents which did not really occur.

The Hour Struck by Dan E. L. Patch

Of the characters in The Hour Struck , Dan Patch writes, “The hero depicts the victim of “fifth column police politics” prevalent in far too many communities today. The heroine, facing unavoidable circumstances, has no alternative but to fight for the right to protect the good name of those whom she loves. The villains are numerous and represent a system of corrupt politics motivated by selfishness, greed and sin in the hearts of men.

His Somber Rivals by Edward Roe

“The following story has been taking form in my mind for several years, and at last I have been able to write it out… At this distance from the late Civil War, it is time that passion and prejudice sank below the horizon. “The title of the story will naturally lead the reader to expect that deep shadows rest upon many of its pages. I know it is scarcely the fashion of the present time to portray men and women who feel very deeply about anything, but there certainly was deep feeling at the time of which I write, as, in truth, there is today.

Behind the Veil by Dan E. L. Patch

“The invisible hand moved mysteriously among the members of First Community Church and struck Reverend Stephen Winthrop. The blow was meant solely for him, but it struck deeply into the inner circle of the church membership, though he would have preferred to suffer alone… The evidence appeared surreptitiously: a picture lying face upward in the path of Amelia Decker.” Dan E. L. Patch began his public service as a patrolman in the Police Department of the City of Highland Park.

The Eternal Choice by Joseph Hocking

“You don’t mind my being absolutely frank, do you?” continued Baxter after a somewhat awkward silence. “It’s years since I spoke to anyone about such things, and I really want to know.” “To know what?” and the young minister looked at him wonderingly. “Whether what you preach has any real meaning to you.” “Why, hasn’t it to you?” “Not a bit,” replied Baxter. Joseph Hocking was a Cornish novelist and United Methodist Free Church minister.

Past Finding Out by Dan E. L. Patch

“Young Doctor Jack Thrillby stepped out of the operating room and heard the newsboys in the street below shouting “MILLIONAIRE’S DAUGHTER KIDNAPPED.” “In this streamlined story, Chief Patch emphasizes the fact that a conviction of sin, with the salvation which follows, is the only solution of the country’s crime problems, since there is no permanent cure for crime apart from the gospel of Jesus Christ. The gospel puts the cure where it belongs — in the heart.

Without a Home by Edward Roe

“That man is an opium-eater,” he said in a low tone, and his explanation of the effects of the drug was a diagnosis of Mr. Jocelyn’s symptoms and appearance. The firm’s sympathy for a man seemingly in poor health was transformed into disgust and antipathy, since there is less popular toleration of this weakness than of drinking habits. The very obscurity in which the vice is involved makes it seem all the more unnatural and repulsive, and it must be admitted that the fullest knowledge tends only to increase this horror and repugnance, even though pity is awakened for the wretched victim.

The Jesuit by Joseph Hocking

“I saw now what I had never realized before. The Church of Rome was like no other Church. It did not demand liberty simply that it might extend its distinctive religious dogmas, and thus lead others to adopt those dogmas; it demanded liberty that it might destroy liberty. It was not simply a religious body; it was primarily a huge political machine, which worked for supremacy. It was struggling to obtain power whereby it might make any other form of religion impossible.

The Wilderness by Joseph Hocking

“Lift me up,” he said. Endellion lifted him up, and the dying man seized the pen. “I give everything I have here in Australia, and all I possess in Dulverton, Devon, England, or elsewhere, to my good friend Ralph Endellion. I’m dying, but my mind is sound. “Robert Granville Dulverton.” Joseph Hocking was a Cornish novelist and United Methodist Free Church minister. Like the American Presbyterian minister Edward Roe, Hocking’s novels combine rich characters with gripping stories.

All for a Scrap of Paper by Joseph Hocking

“He had expected to be immediately forwarded to some dirty German prison, where he would suffer the same fate as many of his English comrades. Instead of which, however, he might almost have been a guest of honor. For this reason he could not help coming to the conclusion that this special treatment was for some purpose. “On the second day after the interview mentioned in the last chapter, he was closely questioned by some German officers.

The Earth Trembled by Edward Payson Roe

The Charleston Earthquake of August 31, 1886 (8.6 on the Richter scale) was strong enough to be felt in Boston, Chicago, New Orleans and Milwaukee. It caused speculation that Florida had broken off the continent. [Wikipedia: 1886 Charleston earthquake] Roe’s novel explores its effects in the context of the relations between North and South after the American Civil War. Edward Payson Roe (1838-1888) was educated at Williams College and Auburn Theological Seminary.

Sham by Joseph Hocking

“He remembered the thoughts that had flooded his mind when first the idea came to him to take Barcroft’s identity; to be Barcroft… He had only wondered whether he could carry out the project successfully. Then he had come to his decision. He had buried Barcroft’s body under the débris of the mining camp. He had dressed himself in Barcroft’s clothes; he had appropriated his papers, his bank-book, his possessions, his name, and had come to England as the Vicar of St.

A Day of Fate by Edward Payson Roe

"It is a love story, pure and simple, of the type that belongs to no age or clime or school, because it is the story of the love that has been common to humanity, wherever it has been lifted above the level of the brutes." — New York Observer On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents List of Illustrations Reviews for A Day of Fate Preface Book 1 1.

A Face Illumined by Edward Payson Roe

"A Face Illumined is one of E.P. Roe's best novels in my opinion. I loved his thoughts on inner beauty. –eleniel "The author does not, as is often the case, make the moral design an excuse for literary shortcomings. His characters are stamped with a strong individuality, and depicted with a naturalness that indicates a keen student of human nature and modern life." — Boston Traveller On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents Reviews Preface 1.

A Knight of the Century by Edward Payson Roe

“It is a book which those who begin will be pretty sure to finish, deriving from it a new impulse to the truest knighthood.” — Harper’s Magazine. “The whole tone of the work is manly and healthful. It is thoroughly noble in all its teachings and tendencies.” — Utica Herald. Edward Payson Roe (1838-1888) was educated at Williams College and Auburn Theological Seminary. He was chaplain of the Second New York Cavalry, U.

From Jest to Earnest by Edward Payson Roe

"He vindicates his right to use the talent which God has given him for the instruction and interest of the thousands who read his works." — New York Evangelist. "The hero is simple, strong, and manly; much such a man as Mr. Lincoln must have been had he turned his attention to theology instead of politics." — New York World. "It is surprising to find how genuinely interesting his stories always are.

Opening a Chestnut Burr by Edward Payson Roe

“The character of the selfish, morbid, cynical hero, and his gradual transformation under the influence of the sweet and high-spirited heroine, are portrayed with a masculine firmness, which is near akin to power, and some of the conversations are animated and admirable.” — Atlantic Monthly “The most able story that we have had from the pen of Mr. Roe. It is also the best of the so-called religious novels published of late.

What Can She Do? a novel by Edward Roe

“The narrative is fascinating.” — Chicago Advance. “An exceedingly well-written story.” — Churchman. On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents Reviews Preface 1. Three Girls 2. A Future Of Human Designing 3. Three Men 4. The Skies Darkening 5. The Storm Threatening 6. The Wreck 7. Among The Breakers 8. Warped 9. A Desert Island 10. Edith Becomes A “Divinity” 11.

The Moon Over Willow Run a novel by Dan E. L. Patch

“This novel by the police chief of Ypsilanti, Michigan, gives us a love story written from the Christian standpoint. It deals with such vital themes as the Great Commission, the problem of love and marriage between a believer and an unbeliever, and Christian patriotism. It is a timely book and one that should be helpful to our people.” – Christian Observer “A very readable novel, in an up-to-the-minute setting, tells the old, old story – ever new – the power of the Gospel in the lives of everyday people.