Protestant Reformation

First Principles Of The Reformation – The Three Primary Works Of Luther And The 95 Theses by Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim

Many people have opinions about Martin Luther, but few have actually read his words. This small volume includes what church scholars Henry Wace and C. A. Buchheim consider Luther’s three primary works.

Martin Luther: The Hero of the Reformation by Henry Eyster Jacobs

“Professor Jacobs is an exceptionally sympathetic and competent biographer… (He) has availed himself of all the latest sources of information, and done the needful work of selection and condensation with excellent judgment and skill.

Discourses on Romanism and the Reformation by Emanuel Greenwald

“We can only estimate correctly the Reformation, when we rightly understand the state of things in the Church which called for it. If it was not necessary, it ought not to have taken place.

The Confessional Principle and The Confessions of The Lutheran Church As Embodying The Evangelical Confession of The Christian Church With Translations from the Introductions and Writings of Theodor Kolde, Professor In Erlangen by Theodore E. Schmauk

Theodore Schmauk’s exploration and defense of the Christian faith consists of five parts: Historical Introduction Part 1: Are Confessions Necessary? Part 2: Confessions in the Church Part 3: Lutheran Confessions Part 4: The Church in America “This book is written in the belief that the one ultimate authority among men is truth.

The Reformation and the Lutheran Church: Sermons and Addresses by American Lutheran Pastors

“We have certainly great reason to be wide awake and watchful, if we would preserve the inheritance of the Lutheran Church Reformation. Strong are the delusions and temptations of these latter days, and you children and youthful Christians will doubtless see still more perilous times for the Church of Jesus Christ before you have grown old.

The Augsburg Confession: An Introduction and Exposition by Matthias Loy

“Sincere believers of the truth revealed in Christ for man’s salvation have no reason to be ashamed of Luther, whom God sent to bring again to His people the precious truth in Jesus and whose heroic contention for the faith once delivered to the saints led to the establishment of the Church of the Augsburg Confession, now generally called the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

Antichrist and His Ten Kingdoms by Albert Close

“The expositions of Daniel and Revelation in this Book are for the most part blendings of the eight great Historicist Expositors of the 19th and 20th Centuries, viz: Bickersteth, Elliott, Barnes, Prof.

The Divine Programme of the World's History by Albert Close

“This book is not a book of one man’s ideas. It is a compendium of the teaching and interpretations of the Prophetic Scriptures by some of the greatest, most learned and spiritually minded men the Christian Church has produced.

The Revolutionary Movement: A Diagnosis of World Disorders by John Findlater

What is going on in America? “Lock-downs”, riots in 100 cities, mass unemployment, the destruction of small businesses. This rare little book ties current events into the great chess game of history.

Romanism and the Reformation by Henry Grattan Guinness

“The Reformation of the sixteenth century, which gave birth to Protestantism, was based on Scripture. It gave back to the world the Bible. It taught the Scriptures; it exposed the errors and corruptions of Rome by the use of the sword of the Spirit… We have suffered prophetic anti-papal truth to be too much forgotten.

The Book of Concord: The Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church by Henry Eyster Jacobs and Charles Krauth

Henry Eyster Jacobs' Book of Concord in modern English is highly respected and has been widely used. It is now back in print and available in all formats. The Augsburg Confession, Apology, Small and Large Catechisms, and Formula are also available as separate books.

The Small Catechism of Martin Luther edited by Henry Eyster Jacobs

Luther’s Little Instruction Book (Small Catechism) has been translated into many of the languages of the world. Williston Walker in his History of the Christian Church describes it as “one of the noblest monuments of the Reformation”.

The Apology of The Augsburg Confession by Philip Melanchthon

“The Apology is more than a mere polemical treatise. It is a thorough discussion, in all its relations, of the cardinal doctrine of Justification by Faith alone, without Works; for whatever be the article treated, the discussion always reverts to this theme.

The Augsburg Confession With The Saxon Visitation Articles by Martin Luther

The Augsburg Confession is the first part of the Book of Concord, the Lutheran Confessions. The Saxon Visitation Articles were used by pastors to instruct their congregants and appeared in Saxon editions of the Book of Concord until the forced union of Lutheran and Reformed in the Nineteenth Century.

The Formula of Concord by Henry Eyster Jacobs

“The Formula of Concord is the result of controversies within the Lutheran Church after the breach with the Papacy had become complete… It required more than a single generation for the Evangelical faith in all its power to penetrate the minds and lives of even its staunchest adherents; and when we recall the deplorable condition into which the Church had fallen, and the deep ignorance not only of the people, but also of the ministry, described in the introductions to the Catechisms, we cannot wonder at the subsequent internal struggles, when the controversy with the Papists absorbed less attention…

Luther's Large Catechism translated by Henry Eyster Jacobs

“The attentive reader… will see that the matters here treated are not antiquated or obsolescent, but enter most deeply into the issues of the hour.” — Henry Eyster Jacobs Clear print, large format quality paperback available on Amazon by the Lutheran Librarian

The Life and Deeds of Martin Luther by Fick and Loy

“Formerly the whole Evangelical Lutheran Church was unanimous in the conviction that Luther was the divinely commissioned Reformer of the Church and the herald of divine truth. “But now (many) deny him this honor.

The Lutheran Reformation and the Jews by Armas Holmio

“The mediaeval history of the Jews is a tale of well-nigh ceaseless persecutions and exilings; and even when life was fairly peaceful and safe for them, they were, nevertheless, shunned. The assertion of Tacitus that they were the enemies of mankind, persisted from one century to another…

Why Study the Lutheran Confessions? by Charles Krauth [Journal Article]

“It is vastly more important to know what the Reformation retained than what it overthrew; for the overthrow of error, though often an indispensable prerequisite to the establishment of truth, is not truth itself; it may clear the foundation simply to substitute one error for another, perhaps a greater for a less.

The Table Talk of Doctor Martin Luther: A Selection

“Luther was in the habit of talking much to the friends who gathered round him at the evening meal in his home at Wittenberg. In these talks he revealed himself with a frankness which has few parallels in history.