Nonconformist

David Baring by Joseph Hocking

Is true Christianity Marxist? David Baring is a young Cambridge graduate who unexpectedly comes into a large fortune. Circumstances cause him to wonder if a rich man can really tell if he is loved for himself, or only for his money. He begins to despise his wealth and like many people today wonders if Socialism is the answer. Joseph Hocking (1860-1937) was a Cornish novelist and United Methodist Free Church minister.

The Man Who Almost Lost by Joseph Hocking

Marcus Baron is an Officer and decorated war hero who faces multiple difficulties returning to civilian life in England after World War I. On This Page Excerpt About the Author Order a Printed Copy Download the eBook Publication Information Excerpt When Marcus Baron regained consciousness he found himself lying in a well-furnished bedroom, while sitting with him was a uniformed nurse. For some time he was unable to connect cause with event.

The Story of Andrew Fairfax by Joseph Hocking

“Brought up as a gentleman, Andrew Fairfax, on the death of his benefactor, is reduced to the position of a farm laborer, from which he raises himself by the writing of a successful novel.” About The Author Joseph Hocking was a Cornish novelist and United Methodist Free Church minister. Like the American Presbyterian minister Edward Roe, Hocking’s novels combine rich characters with gripping stories. Joseph Hocking published more than 100 books and was greatly respected as a fiction writer.

The Eternal Choice by Joseph Hocking

“You don’t mind my being absolutely frank, do you?” continued Baxter after a somewhat awkward silence. “It’s years since I spoke to anyone about such things, and I really want to know.” “To know what?” and the young minister looked at him wonderingly. “Whether what you preach has any real meaning to you.” “Why, hasn’t it to you?” “Not a bit,” replied Baxter. Joseph Hocking was a Cornish novelist and United Methodist Free Church minister.

The Jesuit by Joseph Hocking

“I saw now what I had never realized before. The Church of Rome was like no other Church. It did not demand liberty simply that it might extend its distinctive religious dogmas, and thus lead others to adopt those dogmas; it demanded liberty that it might destroy liberty. It was not simply a religious body; it was primarily a huge political machine, which worked for supremacy. It was struggling to obtain power whereby it might make any other form of religion impossible.

The Wilderness by Joseph Hocking

“Lift me up,” he said. Endellion lifted him up, and the dying man seized the pen. “I give everything I have here in Australia, and all I possess in Dulverton, Devon, England, or elsewhere, to my good friend Ralph Endellion. I’m dying, but my mind is sound. “Robert Granville Dulverton.” Joseph Hocking was a Cornish novelist and United Methodist Free Church minister. Like the American Presbyterian minister Edward Roe, Hocking’s novels combine rich characters with gripping stories.

All for a Scrap of Paper by Joseph Hocking

“He had expected to be immediately forwarded to some dirty German prison, where he would suffer the same fate as many of his English comrades. Instead of which, however, he might almost have been a guest of honor. For this reason he could not help coming to the conclusion that this special treatment was for some purpose. “On the second day after the interview mentioned in the last chapter, he was closely questioned by some German officers.

The Pilgrim's Progress (Illustrated) by John Bunyan

Rev. William Landels writes: The Pilgrim’s Progress is, without question, of all uninspired volumes, the most extraordinary book in the English language. Regard being had to the condition of its author, and the circumstances connected with its production, to its widespread popularity, and its suitableness for readers of every class, there is none to compare with it. It is so well known, that any information concerning either it or its author seems superfluous; and our ingenuity is at a loss to know how to write an introduction for a book for which, above all others, no introduction is required.

Sham by Joseph Hocking

“He remembered the thoughts that had flooded his mind when first the idea came to him to take Barcroft’s identity; to be Barcroft… He had only wondered whether he could carry out the project successfully. Then he had come to his decision. He had buried Barcroft’s body under the débris of the mining camp. He had dressed himself in Barcroft’s clothes; he had appropriated his papers, his bank-book, his possessions, his name, and had come to England as the Vicar of St.