General Synod

The Augsburg Confession With The Saxon Visitation Articles by Martin Luther

The Augsburg Confession is the first part of the Book of Concord, the Lutheran Confessions. The Saxon Visitation Articles were used by pastors to instruct their congregants and appeared in Saxon editions of the Book of Concord until the forced union of Lutheran and Reformed in the Nineteenth Century. In republishing this book, we seek to introduce this editor and content to a new generation of those seeking authentic spirituality.

On The Division Of The Decalogue by Charles Schaeffer

“After the Israelites had reached the wilderness of Sinai, Moses informed them that it was the purpose of God to come down upon mount Sinai in the sight of all, and make a covenant with his people. On the third day the people met with God, and heard his voice which proceeded from the fire, the cloud and the thick darkness… “The Lord wrote the words which he had pronounced, on two tables of stone, and delivered them to Moses.

Charles Augustus Stork: Recollections

Charles A. Stork came of a line of preachers. His grandfather, Carl August Gottlieb Storch, had been sent from Germany in the year 1788, as a missionary to the Lutheran Church in North Carolina, where he labored faithfully until his death in 1831. He bequeathed his calling and his devotion to the ministry, together with his name Gottlieb (anglice Theophilus) to his youngest son, Theophilus Stork, who in his turn handed them down to his own eldest son, named after his grandfather, Charles Augustus Stork.

Letter to a Skeptic by Charles Krauth

“The tone of levity, in which you often indulge, leads me to fear, that you do not sufficiently realize your accountability for your doubts… Remember, it is the infirmity of an honest mind, to believe until compelled to disbelieve; that it is proof of a dishonest and depraved one, to disbelieve until forced to believe.” – Charles Krauth On This Page Doubt the Historical Accuracy of the Bible? Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Doubt the Historical Accuracy of the Bible?

The Silent Influence of the Bible by Joseph FewSmith

“Now it is found that in the Bible reading nations there is and ever has been, more liberty, more elevation of the people, more general comfort and happiness, and more general intelligence, as well as a higher regard to the laws of equity, of benevolence, of social kindness, than in those nations which are ignorant of God’s Word. – Joseph FewSmith On This Page Book Contents Download the eBook Publication Information Book Contents The Silent Influence Of The Bible.

Church Government by George Lintner

“Men, who in their hearts are strangers to true religion, and opposed to its real interests, are always ready to exercise a controlling influence over the church. In almost every religious community, there are some such men, who would carry the spirit of the world into religion. They have an idea, that the church cannot be sustained without bringing in this worldly influence. “Let ministers and officers of churches beware of such an influence.

The Missouri Doctrine of Election by Otto Zöckler

"A decade has fully passed since the outbreak of the eventful controversy which has divided the Lutherans of North America into two camps. Dr. Walther showed already in the years of 1864—70, a leaning to the Calvinistic doctrines… The controversy itself broke out first in the year 1872, when Lehre und Wehre, the organ of the Missourians, (p. 205) directed a sharp attack upon Philippi of Rostock, accusing him of Synergism on account of his treatment of the doctrine of conversion in his Dogmatics.

Sermons of Theophilus Stork: A Devotional Treasure

“There are many of us who believe; we are convinced; but our souls do not take fire at contact with the truth. Happy he who not only believes, but believes with fire. “It is not necessary to suppose that Dr. Stork believed the truths of the Gospel, which he loved to preach, more deeply than others of his brethren; but his was that happy constitution of soul which, when it embraces a truth, embraces it with ardor and believes it with energy.

The Bible a Perfect Book by Charles Krauth

“The word of God is… inspired, for it comes from God; it is human, for it comes through man. But remember, we do not say that the human is without the divine. The Spirit, is incarnate in the Word, as the Son was incarnate in Christ. – Charles Krauth On This Page Both Christ and the Bible are “The Word” The Simplest Interpretation is The Best Download the eBook Publication Information Both Christ and the Bible are “The Word” “There is a deep significance in the fact, that the title of “the Word” is given both to Christ, the Revealer, and to the Bible, the revelation of God, so that in some passages great critics differ as to which is meant.

Why Study the Lutheran Confessions? by Charles Krauth

“It is vastly more important to know what the Reformation retained than what it overthrew; for the overthrow of error, though often an indispensable prerequisite to the establishment of truth, is not truth itself; it may clear the foundation simply to substitute one error for another, perhaps a greater for a less. “By a careful study of the symbolical books of our church, commencing with the Augsburg Confession and its Apology, a more thorough understanding of the history, difficulties, true genius, and triumphs of the Reformation will be attained than by reading every thing that can be got, or that has ever been written about that memorable movement.

Martin Luther, Friend or Foe of the Jews by Armas Holmio on 'Concerning the Jews and Their Lies'

“One of the areas in which the Reformer has been repeatedly misrepresented has to do with the relationship of the Church with the Jewish people, frequent attempts being made to link him with modern anti-Semitism. Such attempts call for clarification by the Church of the Reformer’s actual position. “[Luther] reflects his true heart attitude toward the Jews with this prayer: ‘O God, heavenly Father, turn and let thy wrath over them be brought to an end, for the sake of thy dear Son.

No Hierarchy In The Ministerial Office by D. Worley

“We have had occasion several times, in self-defense, to declare our conscientious difference from the brethren of the Missouri as well as from those of the Buffalo Synod, on the doctrine of the Ministerial office; by some whom we think a little sensitive in the matter, we have been soundly berated, both privately and publicly, for having done so. We feel it, therefore, due to ourselves, and to the cause of truth, to present a calm expression of truth as we believe it to be found in the Holy Scriptures.

How Should The Gospel Be Preached by Benjamin Kurtz

“There is a strait gait of knowledge through which [everyone] must pass on entering the kingdom, and many of the results of his reasonings must be abandoned at that entrance, while he confesses himself a mere disciple all the way in his progress.” “The man of the mightiest genius or the most accomplished intellect, must become a docile child, as well as the most uncultivated sinner and the rudest savage — or never be spiritually renovated.

Catechization by John Morris

“In the primitive church there was a private and public catechization. The private was practiced by parents according to Eph. 6:4… The public was held in schools, churches, and other places, and the pupils were called catechumens, from κατγχουμενοι, learners, the word that is used in the New Testament passages before quoted. “In the course of ages, as the church became more corrupt, the practice fell into disuse, or sadly degenerated.

Christian Liberty by Charles Krauth

“The body without the spirit is dead, but it retains for a while the form; and while the form is there, hope may sometimes lie cherished that life will yet revisit it; but when even the form is gone, and the body fallen to ashes, unless God shall speak, hope is extinct forever. “It is a sad thing to see the form robbed of the power; but there is one stage of misery below this.

Life Reminiscences of an Old Lutheran Minister by John Gottlieb Morris

“…Even after the Seminary was established at Gettysburg, systematic and sustained, but covert, attack upon the Symbolical Books was made. The result was that the books were not regarded with favor by many of the ministers and students, and very many did not accept the doctrine of the sacraments as taught in the Lutheran Church. “This continued to be the state of affairs for many years. There were some that were true Lutherans despite these adverse circumstances.

Christian Endress: A Biographical Sketch

His life was devoted to the acquisition of knowledge. The church has always associated with Dr. Lochman’s name that of Dr. Endress. They were not only contemporary, but they were nearly of the same age. They commenced their career together and pursued their studies in company. They were graduated at the University of Pennsylvania and both for a season, gave instruction. They studied theology under the direction of Drs.

The Trial of Professor Luther A. Gotwald by Wittenberg Seminary

In 1893 an attempt was made by liberal elements in the General Synod to remove Dr. Luther Gotwald from Wittenberg Seminary. He was said to be guilty of teaching the Augsburg Confession as, “a correct expression or exhibition of fundamental divine truth”. The record of the attacks against this conservative Lutheran makes riveting reading and speaks directly to the battles faithful Christians face from within the church. Book Contents Preface.

The Nature of Fundamental Doctrines by Charles F. Schaeffer

“What are ‘fundamental doctrines,’ or ‘fundamental Articles of Faith’?… Every intelligent Christian feels competent to state the general basis of his belief, or the doctrinal foundation of his Christian character and life… When he, however, proceeds to specify in detail the doctrines which essentially constitute that ‘foundation,’ he will no longer be surprised by the embarrassment that even distinguished divines, on attempting to furnish an answer, have candidly confessed.” – Charles F.

George Lochman: A Biographical Sketch

“Dr. Lochman, so widely and favorably known in the Lutheran church, was born in the city of Philadelphia, December 2, 1773. His parents had immigrated into this country at an early period and, although in humble circumstances, were distinguished for their probity and piety. Their son George, when yet a boy, seemed to promise much, and awakened high expectations. He developed, in his childhood, a remarkable fondness for reading. Whilst his companions were engaged with their sports, he was interested in his books, over whose pages he poured with fixed attention and the greatest delight.